Google Maps' forced quickest-route method is my biggest gripe about driving directions. Some afternoons, I ask Maps to tell me which route to take home, usually to avoid construction. Today was one of those times.

Update: I should update this.

These are mostly just vague ideas of changes I would make if I were in charge of things. My preferred type of national government would be one that is decentralized and put in to the hands of local governments as much as possible, especially for a nation as large as Canada (that's thing #1), so some of these would be more relevant if I were in charge of provincial or municipal government, and not on a national level.

I was looking at various services that send you the ingredients and recipes for meals, so one doesn't have to think, and I realized what kind of service I really want. I don't mind shopping, and I would rather buy in bulk than pay for individual meal's ingredients, and the tough part is picking out what to make. My dream service would basically be a meal-planning service.

I've been using Let's Encrypt since it was early in beta to get an certificate, but the process was a bit painful (not for me, but painful enough to not recommend to "average people") as one had to install and run a bunch of command line stuff to do it.

Thankfully, someone used their API to build this lovely site to generate them all in-browser. It's a bit more work than going through one's web host, and the certificates last only 3 months, so you have to do it four times a year, but it's free.

I made a shortlist of my favourite movies.

It was difficult to quantify what makes a movie my favourite. At first, I started out with movies that I wouldn't mind watching again at a moment's notice, but some of these require the right mood, and some I haven't seen for a long time, and don't want to ruin what I enjoyed then.

Here they are, in alphabetical order:

I've commented on the opening credits of TV show episodes to the point that my wife has started making fun of me for it.

Here's five of my favourites.

Silicon Valley

I'm a subscriber of The Listserve, a mailing list where, every day, one of the ~22,000 subscribers is randomly chosen to share something. Last week, I was given this chance. I didn't have much to say (you can read what I wrote here), but I took the opportunity to ask the audience for book/media recommendations.

An interesting theoretical question was poised today in our office: Why doesn't Canada Post, instead of raising postage prices to cover postage costs, reduce the number of mail deliveries? Many homes and businesses receive less than an average of one addressed mail item per day. Wouldn't it be nice if mail only came 2-3 days a week, and you knew for certain that there'll be something in your mailbox when you check it?

Nota bene: for the sake of simplicity, assume I'm talking about audio podcasts. Video podcasts are cool, but a totally different ball game.

I spend more time in the average week listening to podcasts than consuming any other kind of media. (Music is the only medium that comes close.) Each aspect of podcasting seems to trump a certain other form of media.

Distributed

Podcast episodes are stored locally on one's devices, so you don't need a active internet connection to listen. This is great for people on the go who don't want to pay for Canada's super-expensive mobile data.

Snapchat, despite all it's flaws and concerns, is very quickly becoming my favourite social network. Not my most used social network, mind you, but my favourite. It's all because of the ability to actively network with your friends.