An interesting theoretical question was poised today in our office: Why doesn't Canada Post, instead of raising postage prices to cover postage costs, reduce the number of mail deliveries? Many homes and businesses receive less than an average of one addressed mail item per day. Wouldn't it be nice if mail only came 2-3 days a week, and you knew for certain that there'll be something in your mailbox when you check it?

Nota bene: for the sake of simplicity, assume I'm talking about audio podcasts. Video podcasts are cool, but a totally different ball game.

I spend more time in the average week listening to podcasts than consuming any other kind of media. (Music is the only medium that comes close.) Each aspect of podcasting seems to trump a certain other form of media.

Distributed

Podcast episodes are stored locally on one's devices, so you don't need a active internet connection to listen. This is great for people on the go who don't want to pay for Canada's super-expensive mobile data.

Snapchat, despite all it's flaws and concerns, is very quickly becoming my favourite social network. Not my most used social network, mind you, but my favourite. It's all because of the ability to actively network with your friends.

I recently had the opportunity to take part in designing a typeface along with my boss. We made this lovely handwritten script typeface and named it after his dog. It's free for all forms of use, so you should go download it now.

Updated 24 March 2016, with new shows that I've found.

A few people have asked me, recently, what podcasts I listen to. First off, I listen to all my podcasts using Overcast for iOS, a great podcast client built by Marco Amert. Here's a list, sorted by how long I've been listening.

  • No Agenda
    The best podcast in the universe. Twice a week, Adam Curry and John C. Dvorak deconstruct recent news, media, and memes in a free-flowing conversation. Episode 200.7 is a great starting point and introduction for new listeners.

​Malls should have mandatory valet parking. Maybe not all malls, but at least malls that are big enough to need multi-level parking.

Take West Edmonton Mall as an example. If any mall were to have valet parking, WEM, being the largest in North America, would really benefit from it. (Right now, just the hotel has a valet service.) If one goes to the mall in the early evening or on weekends, the parking lot is a madhouse.